Web 2.0, Library 2.0, Librarian 2.0 – Updated!

What is the 2.0 environment and what do you do with it? Jessamyn West from Randolph (VT) Technical Career Center describes ways New England libraries have been using new technologies, and also some old tech, to reach and interact with patrons in new ways. It’s all about ideas, examples, and links, links, links.

Slides and links referenced in Jessamyn’s talk are available at her website:

http://www.librarian.net/talks/nelal2/

Library 2.0 and beyond
Jessamyn West
Tuesday, 10:30

For a photo of Jessamyn, see Chronicle of Higher Ed article about “young librarians:” http://chronicle.com/temp/email2.php?id=VxjmgshrNpdB5jdzxjxvtfmcxrXX5tpR
That’s her on Casey Bisson’s iPhone.

This is sort of a sequel to last year’s Library 2.0 presentation at NELA.

Everyone, even small libraries, can get into the L2 game.

All photos in the presentation are from Flickr.

L2 is a service model/idea. Tim O’Reilly, creator of the O’Reilly series of programming books, coined the Web 2.0 term, tying together a bunch of trends in interactivity. Marketing buzzword to get people to conferences. Librarians: we can apply this to our service model. Grouping similar things together. Implication that we’re leaving behind 1.0 world. Acknowledging that we are changing the way we do business. We’re not all up to speed–not us, not our patrons/customers. But often it solves a real problem.

L2 ethos: Save a Stamp. Being more useful.

L2 is like obscenity–we know it when we see it. Depends on the circumstances. Relative to the alternatives. There’s no predefined list. User-centered.

Librarians like to search, but everyone else likes to find!

Network effects by default. Not so much just a couple of years ago.

User-generated content and MARC std: we need both. We need both.

Is what I’m doing reaching my users?

It’s all beta. Constant evaluation is possible, not like boxed software.

Feedback. The question wall.

Toolkit: not stuff but methods. You don’t have to have a blog (but why wouldn’t you?)

Change the website with the seasons.

Be willing to Experiment. It’s marketing, and knowing who your users are.

Go where your users are; go where you’re needed. Leave your building; help your users where they are. Linking to other libraries.

Avoid data silos. (Gale Group, InfoTrac) Not findable by Google. No network effect. Many catalogs don’t support non-expiring URLs.

Recognize usability: Cook Memorial Library,Tamworth, NH: using Scriblio. Compare to “OPAC Name Headings Search, LC call number, charged/not charged (library jargon).” Recognize the absence of usability. Remember what easy to use looks like: RI Historical Society.

Library Homepage for Distance Ed at SCSU: wow, a human works here!

Library Tech Tools: Chelmsford

Plymouth State U. Also uses Scriblio.

Cutest OPAC ever.

Accept experimentation.

Try and evaluate: Book Notes New Hampshire. New Hampshire Reads Fahrenheit 451. Create a blog just for a project.

Use the network to do what you already do. Example: Facebook group: Awesome Resources. Tools for library research.

Go new places: Second Life. Free live conferencing. American Memory Exhibit. Kansas State Library is in SL.

Save the time of the user. (Ranganathan)

LibX add-on for Firefox. Get all up in their web. (go where the users are)

UConn Library Staff wiki for ITS Software.

Nancy Keane’s Booktalks — Quick and Simple (NH)

Demand usability from products and vendors. Do your own usability testing.

Give constructive feedback: III User’s Group website. Branding is important for the vendor, but not for our finders.

Know why web standards are important.

Consider open source options. (Hire local) gapines.org

Library 2.0 is not a religion. It’s not just about technology. It’s about awareness.

Slow Library Ahead – L2 is not just about speed, it’s about customer service.

PLCMC and Learning 2.0: libraries and fun.

What is next?

3 Responses

  1. What did we ever do before conference blogging? O brave new world!

    I have a theory that smaller libraries may actually be able to implement 2.0 initiatives more easily – smaller staff, fewer differences to negotiate. Given that I’ve never worked in a small library though (yet – it’s a goal!), I’d love to hear from folks who have practical experience in these matters.

    Thanks again for an informative post that benefits the desk-bound!

  2. I think you’re right about small libraries often being more flexible and open. Sarah Morgan, our teen services librarian, started a teen blog last year. The way she tells it, the conversation with our director to initiate the project took all of thirty seconds.

  3. Hey thanks very much for taking such great notes. I have friends who always get fussy because I don’t usually record my talks. I’ll send them to this post!

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